Undesired Consequences (or paying the price for other people’s actions)

As my wife and I neared the end of a week filled with tantrums and misbehavior from our foster son, we’d both pretty much had enough. As we were right in the middle of another meltdown she looked at me and said “Why? Why is this happening?” I immediately responded without thinking and said “Because we’re paying the price for other people’s actions.” And as soon as I said it, I stopped.

I stopped because I immediately realized that suffering the consequences of other people’s actions is exactly what Jesus did on the cross. The Bible tells us that the wages of sin is death¹ and that he who knew no sin became sin for us². So all of my sinful actions (and trust me, there are plenty) ended up in Jesus dying on the cross and paying the penalty that I deserved, which was death.

But it doesn’t just stop there either! Not only do I not reap the consequences of my sin, but I also receive the free gift of eternal life. Jesus paid my debt and then turned around and gifted me something I never could have earned for myself. So while I’ll still suffer temporal consequences of sin and death (after all, we still live in a fallen world), I can rest secure knowing that my eternal life is paid for. What a glorious picture of God’s redemptive work in our lives!

It’s true, we’ve signed up to parent someone else’s child and to deal with all kinds of baggage we didn’t bring on ourselves. But before I get too self-righteous, I need to remember that I bring plenty of baggage to the party and ultimately someone else paid the final price for my sin, and for that I will be eternally grateful.

 

¹For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.  -Romans 6:23 (ESV)

²For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.  -2 Corinthians 5:21 (ESV)

Why? (Or things that a 4 year-old is teaching me about my relationship to God)

whyMy wife and I recently welcomed a 4 year old foster child into our home. It’s been an adjustment for all of us, but the biggest thing we’ve had to get used to is the questions.  The constant questions.  Of why?

Why?

Why?

Why?

Everything is why? Why this, why that, why is it raining, why isn’t it raining, why?

So the other day, in the middle of a why chain, my wife looks at me and says, “Do you think we sound this way to God?”

And you know what? I think she’s right. Far too often I find myself asking God why.  And I think it is a legitimate question, but I think that sometimes I sound like a four year-old to God. Why? Why didn’t I get that job? Why did my friend get cancer? Why do I have to do this? Why can’t I do that? And then my questioning of God becomes something more than just questioning, it becomes idolatry.

Idolatry?

When I’m questioning God about everything, mostly I think it’s because I think I know better than God, and when that’s the case, I’m telling Him that I should be god and not Him, and that’s idolatry. So questions of why are fine, but they should be firmly grounded in a view of God’s sovereignty and trust in His goodness.  The road may not always be easy and I likely won’t always understand, but this I do know, I can trust God with my life.  He’ll never fail me, even when I don’t understand.

“For my thoughts are not your thoughts,
    neither are your ways my ways, declares the Lord.
For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
    so are my ways higher than your ways
    and my thoughts than your thoughts.”

– Isaiah 55:8-9